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Archive | January, 2008

Beyond the Green Zone #3 Alternet Best Progessive Books / #1 Staff Pick at Powell’s Books

Alternet Best Progressive Books of 2007

Book experts, AlterNet staff and readers weighed in. Here are the groundbreakers that stood out from the crowd.

By Don Hazen, AlterNet

1. The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein
2. Blackwater by Jeremy Scahill
3. Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq
by Dahr Jamail
Haymarket Books

One of the few unaffiliated journalists in Iraq, journalist Jamail went to see the conditions for himself, and the compelling, heartbreaking stories he sent back over his eight-month stay were carried in publications worldwide: from family houses destroyed with their inhabitants to mosques full of people held under siege to the ill-equipped medical facilities and security forces meant to deal with them. (Publishers Weekly)

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Violence Draws Veil Over Women

BAQUBA — Conditions are particularly difficult for women in Baquba, despite the relative lull in violence. The city, about 40 km northeast of Baghdad, is capital of Diyala province, amongst the most troubled regions of Iraq in recent months.

As in all conflict areas, women, along with children and the elderly, have suffered most. A large number of women have been killed or kidnapped during close to five years of occupation.

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Dahr Jamail with Raed Jarrar on Democracy Now!

Dahr Jamail and Iraqi analyst Raed Jarrar interviewed by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! in response to President Bush’s 2008 State of the Union address. Topics include life on the ground in Iraq today, the appearance of US policy changes toward Iraq, and the much-touted “surge” — including analysis of the US’s new Sunni “allies” in Al-Anbar province.

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Tomgram: Dahr Jamail, Missing Voices in the Iraq Debate

There’s an old joke in which a fellow natters on endlessly about himself. Finally, he turns to his friend and says, “Well, enough about me, how about you? What do you think of me?” Sometimes, we in the U.S. seem to be that guy. There are so many voices crucial to understanding our world that we seldom or never hear. They just aren’t attended to. This week at Tomdispatch, Nick Turse brought us the forgotten voices of a lost war in Vietnam and now Dahr Jamail offers voices from an ongoing lost war in Iraq. In many ways, we Americans, whether supporters or critics of the war, manage to fill all the roles when it comes to that country. Watch your TV set and ask yourself how often, in the last years, you’ve heard an ordinary Iraqi speaking at any length about his or her life — or seen the Iraqi equivalent of a “talking head.” We’ve talked our heads off about Iraq and yet how often have we even fulfilled the second part of that old joke and asked Iraqis what they thought of us — or the lives the United States has brought them?

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