Archive | July, 2005

Now on DVD: Falluja 2004

A film by Japanese independent journalist Toshikuni Doi

Fallujah has become a symbol of the resistance movement against the U.S. occupation of Iraq. In April 2004, the U.S. forces invaded Fallujah with several thousand soldiers. Why did Fallujah become a base of the resistance against the occupation? How did the U.S. forces attack? Who fought against them? And what damages and injuries did people suffer? Ten days after the siege of Falluja was lifted, Toshikuni Doi, a Japanese independent journalist, went into Fallujah. His documentary investigates the causes of, the conditions during, and damages from the siege. The documentary is primarily in Arabic, with English subtitles. DVD, 55 minutes.

Toshikuni Doi is a Japanese journalist who has been covering Iraq since just after the U.S. invasion.

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Dahr Jamail Speaks with Amy Goodman about World Tribunal on Iraq

Having just returned from testifying at the culminating session of the World Tribunal on Iraq in Istanbul, Dahr shares information and his perspective on the US occupation of Iraq. In this excellent 20 minute interview, Dahr and Amy discuss the lack of reporting on the recent bombings in Iraq that killed a similar number of civilians as the recent bombings in London. The two discuss, in depth, Dahr’s report about the ailing medical system in Iraq, the actions that the US military has taken against hospitals and care workers that constitute war crimes, and many other topics under-reported by the mainstream US news media.

This short video is fiery and extremely informative. A must see.

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From No Man’s Land to Displacement

The Iraqi/Jordanian border is a land of desolation. Coils of razor wire stretch into the desert whilst sun-grayed plastic bags caught in their sharpness flap in the hot, dry winds. In No Man’s Land, Jamail exposes yet another face of the human consequences of the US occupation of Iraq — the suffering and resistance of displaced Kurdish-Iranian and Palestinian refugees.

Long columns of trucks wait at the Jordanian border to carry their loads of supplies into war-torn Iraq. When Iraqi drivers wish to enter Jordan, they now wait up to 18 days to be allowed in. The al-Karama border is a land of waiting, but not just for the truck drivers. There have been others waiting to enter Jordan for far longer. The refugee camp situated in this bleak area is called No Man’s Land camp because it literally is just that: an area of land caught between the borders of two countries with nowhere else to go.

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Tomgram: Dahr Jamail on the Zarqawi Phenomenon

Just in the last few days, according to USA Today, a “propaganda video purportedly made by al-Qaeda-linked terror suspect Abu Musab al-Zarqawi” has been released showing suicide attacks against U.S. forces in Iraq supposedly inspired by or ordered by him. Since George Bush first mentioned him in October 2002 in a speech in Cincinnati as proof of an al-Qaeda presence in Iraq, and so of Saddam Hussein’s essential al-Qaeda-ness, Zarqawi has moved ever more front and center as Iraq’s main terrorist threat. He now has an enormous bounty on his head and is cited regularly by the President as well as other administration officials as our enemy of enemies in that land, proof positive that Iraq is “the central theater in the war on terror.” In the U.S., he has come to personify the war in Iraq, his presence both a kind of instant why-we-fight explanation for our being there and a living justification for everything we are doing there.

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