Archive | May, 2005

“Things are getting worse by the day.”

The mayhem continues in Iraq, with today at least 40 people dead, including five US soldiers in Diyala province as the meltdown of the failed US-led occupation continues.

Two suicide bombers detonated themselves after walking into a crowd of police officers in Hilla, south of Baghdad. The policemen were demonstrating outside the mayor’s office to protest a government decision to disband their Special Forces unit.

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Sketchy Details

Yesterday Iraq’s Minister of Defense, Sadoun al-Dulaimi, announced that starting Saturday 40,000 Iraqi troops will seal Baghdad and begin to “hunt down insurgents and their weapons.” Baghdad will be divided into two main sections, east and west, and within each section there will be smaller areas of control.

There will be at least 675 checkpoints and al-Dulaimi said this is the first phase of a security crackdown that will eventually cover all of Iraq.

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Daily Life in Baghdad, from Afar

It’s coming apart at the seams now in Iraq. We saw on the news today that members of the Mehdi Army in the south, the militia of Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, exchanged gunfire with members of the ING (Iraqi National Guard) who in the south are primarily, if not entirely composed of members of the Badr Army, also a Shia group. So now we have Shia fighting Shia.

Meanwhile in Baghdad, things are just as bad. Abu Talat, my friend and interpreter, was speaking with his family who live in the al-Adhamiya district of the capital city. Just across the Tigris River from Adhamiya, which is predominantly Sunni, is the predominantly Shia Khadamiyah neighborhood.

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Displaced Iraqis Simmering with Anger in Amman

Interviews with some decidedly angry Iraqis who are refugees living in Amman, Jordan.

Amman, Jordan — It isn’t difficult to find Iraqis in Amman nowadays. The word on the street is that somewhere around half a million have come to Jordan over the last couple of years, seeking security and/or jobs, since they have neither at home in Iraq.

“The American troops have not come for the benefit of the Iraqi people,” says Mohammed Majid Abrahim, a fifty-two-year-old former resident of Baghdad. “They are stealing from the Iraqis, and now all our problems are because of the invaders.”

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